Impundulu

(Im-PON-do-lou) plural: iimpumdulu
Variations: Ishologu
From the Cape region of South Africa comes the impundulu (see AFRICAN VAMPIRE WITCH and VAMPIRIC WITCH). A vampiric creature only about three inches tall in its true form, it usually stays in its shape-shifted form—that of a bird with a red bill, legs, and tail. In addition to its shape-shifting ability, it can also spread "the wasting disease" (tuberculosis), cause infertility in cattle and men, and cause near instant death in a person through a sudden pain in his chest. In its natural form, the impundulu can fly through a small flying machine that is powered by human blood.
At night it attacks both cattle and humans,drinking their blood and consuming their flesh. Alone impundulu can kill an entire herd of cattle in a single evening, as its hunger is that insatiable. Additionally, it enjoys the pain and torment it causes.
An impundulu makes an excellent familiar for a witch, as it is loyal by nature, cannot be destroyed, and can be passed down from mother to daughter, even if the child is not a witch herself. However, if a nonwitch comes to own one of these prized familiars, it must be used or it will turn and kill its master. When bound as a familiar, it will only show itself to its master in its bird form. The impundulu must be fed every night or at least allowed to hunt for itself, or it will turn on the witch and kill her. Obligated to protect the witch as well as her family line, the impundulu can only be passed on to the next master at the time of the witch's death. If not done so, then the impundulu is freed from its obligations and is now referred to as an ishologu and will do at it pleases.
Source: Hodgson, God of the Xhosa, 32, 47­48; Laubscher, Pagan Soul, 128, 131, 151, 153; Marwick, Witchcraft and Sorcery, 371, 427

Encyclopedia of vampire mythology . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • impundulu — /im pŭnˈdŭ lŭ/ (S Afr) noun A mythical bird with magical powers, often identified with the secretary bird ORIGIN: Bantu mpundulu …   Useful english dictionary

  • Impundulu — The Impundulu (or izulucite book last =Jȩdrej first =M. Charles coauthors =Rosalind Shaw title =Dreaming, Religion and Society in Africa publisher =BRILL year =1992 pages =155 url =http://www.google.co.uk/books?id=sj1zcfP1cJgC pg=PA155 d isbn… …   Wikipedia

  • Impundulu — El Scopus umbretta, algunos creen que es la manifestación del Impundulu. El Impundulu o rayo de aves (o Izulu,[1] inyoni yezulu …   Wikipedia Español

  • Creencias sobre vampiros — Le Vampire, litografía de R. de Moraine en Les Tribunaux secrets (1864). A lo largo de la historia y en numerosas culturas h …   Wikipedia Español

  • Vampire — For other uses, see Vampire (disambiguation). The Vampire, by Philip Burne Jones, 1897 Vampires …   Wikipedia

  • List of vampires in folklore and mythology — This list covers the many types of vampires or vampire like legendary creatures of global folklore and mythology. It does not include any vampire that originates in a work of fiction.A*Adze Ghana and Togo *Alp Germany *Aluka Syria and Israel… …   Wikipedia

  • Vampire folklore by region — Legends of vampires have existed for millennia; cultures such as the Mesopotamians, Hebrews, Ancient Greeks, and Romans had tales of demonic entities and blood drinking spirits which are considered precursors to modern vampires. However, despite… …   Wikipedia

  • Vampire — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Vampire (homonymie) …   Wikipédia en Français

  • В мифологии Вампир — Картина «Вампир», автор Philip Burne Jones, 1897 Эта статья рассказывает о вампирах из фольклора и легенд. О вампирах из художественных произведений см. Вампиры в искусстве. О реальных летучих мышах, питающихся кровью см. Вампиры (млекопитающее) …   Википедия

  • Вам-пир — Картина «Вампир», автор Philip Burne Jones, 1897 Эта статья рассказывает о вампирах из фольклора и легенд. О вампирах из художественных произведений см. Вампиры в искусстве. О реальных летучих мышах, питающихся кровью см. Вампиры (млекопитающее) …   Википедия

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.